Tag: Guest

The Challenge of PDSA: Feeling Like You’ve Fallen Short

The Challenge of PDSA: Feeling Like You’ve Fallen Short

Mark's note: Today's post is by Cristal Totterman, a pharmacist and Lean leader I have known for a couple of years now. She's written a post that made me think about and reflect on the never-ending journey of improvement, both as individuals and organizations.

Do We Want The Same Results?

Do We Want The Same Results?

Thanks to Sam Selay for today's guest post. Although he's writing about the government and the military, I think you'll find it interesting regardless of your industry. Read an excerpt from Sam's chapter of Practicing Lean.

Guest Post: What Will Process Excellence Look Like in 2025?

Guest Post: What Will Process Excellence Look Like in 2025?

Mark’s Note: Today’s guest post is brought to you through a media partnership between LeanBlog.org and PEX Network. Lean Blog readers can get a 15% discount by using code “VIP_LeanBlog” to  for their OPEX Week event in Orlando, January 23 to 27, 2017. I’ll be there. Hope to see you.

By December 14, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Guest Post: Learning to Change our Change Management Approach

Guest Post: Learning to Change our Change Management Approach

Mark’s Note: Today’s post is by a new contributor, Nathalie Khodr. We met a few years back in San Antonio thanks to our shared interests in Lean and healthcare improvement. Nathalie asked to write a post that reflected on her participation in my “ExperienceChange” workshop earlier this year. 

By November 10, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Could Lean Thinking Have Prevented the Recent Disney Tragedy?

Could Lean Thinking Have Prevented the Recent Disney Tragedy?

Mark’s Note: I’m going to be away from the blog through July 15, releasing a podcast or two… but here’s another guest post from our friend, Paul Critchley:

For many families, making a trip to Walt Disney World is the quintessential family vacation. My wife and I started planning our Disney trip years ago. We knew we wanted to wait until our daughters were old enough to be able to 1) Remember the trip and 2) Not need to be carried. Although the latter didn’t quite work as planned all the time, I’m certain the former will. With all the anticipation you’d imagine, we finally made the journey last month.

The Blame and Shame(ful) Culture of Healthcare

The Blame and Shame(ful) Culture of Healthcare

Mark’s Note: This is another guest post by Drew Locher (check out past posts and my podcast with him). There’s been a lot in the news about “medical error” arguably being the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States. But what about the errors that don’t cause death, but cause harm and/or annoyance? Drew writes about one such case today and it hits close to home for him…

Conclusion: 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead

Conclusion: 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead

Mark’s note: Here’s the concluding post in a series by a guest blogger, Paul Serafino. You can click here to read earlier posts in this series about leaders who have no one to formally lead. Thanks to Paul for his contributions! 

Part 4 – 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: Host “Free Events”

Part 4 – 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: Host “Free Events”

Mark’s note: Here’s the last of three change strategies in a series by a guest blogger, Paul Serafino. You can click here to read earlier posts in this series about leaders who have no one to formally lead. Next week, I’ll publish Paul’s concluding thoughts and the whole series will be available as a free PDF eBook, as well.

11 Ways You Can Get Ideas to Flow From Staff

11 Ways You Can Get Ideas to Flow From Staff

Mark’s note: Today’s guest post is by Duke Rohe of the Office of Performance Improvement at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. I’ve met Duke many times at the annual Society for Health Systems conference and he’s always a pleasure to talk with. He shares quite a bit online through the online “Healthcare Management Engineers” email list and I got his permission to share these thoughts as this blog post… and I’ll also be recording a podcast with him soon.

By April 28, 2016 1 Comments Read More →
Part 3 – 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: An Apprentice

Part 3 – 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: An Apprentice

Mark’s note: Here’s the latest in the series by a guest blogger, Paul Serafino. Click here to read earlier posts in this series about leaders who have no one to formally lead.

By Paul Serafino:

How Many Exam Rooms Do You Need?

How Many Exam Rooms Do You Need?

Mark’s note: When I first started in healthcare, I worked for a team called ValuMetrix Services, a part of Johnson & Johnson that did consulting for labs and healthcare organizations. During that time, I got to work with Tony Milian. While I came from manufacturing outside of J&J, Tony had moved over from other parts of J&J. It’s been great to re-connect with him recently, to learn more about his consulting that’s focused on eye clinics and other clinic settings. What he wrote, originally part of his email newsletter, applies to all sorts of medical office settings. Visit Tony’s firm’s website and their blog.

Part 2 — 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: Strong Allies

Part 2 — 3 Strategies for Leaders Who Have No One to Lead: Strong Allies

Mark’s note: Last week, I published a post by Paul Serafino titled “3 Strategies for #Lean Leaders Who Have No One to Lead.” Today, and for the next two Tuesdays, Paul shares each of those strategies. Click here for the whole series

3 Strategies for #Lean Leaders Who Have No One to Lead

3 Strategies for #Lean Leaders Who Have No One to Lead

Mark’s note: Today’s post is by a new guest blogger, Paul Serafino. This initial post will be followed by a series of three posts with strategies that he tees up in this post.

By Paul Serafino:

Resistance is Futile? Practical Change Techniques for All Levels of Your Organization

Resistance is Futile? Practical Change Techniques for All Levels of Your Organization

Mark’s Note: This is the week my wife and I are physically moving from San Antonio to the DFW area, so thanks to those who have helped with guest posts.

Today’s guest post is by Sue Kozlowski, who is part of the team at Techsolve, a team that’s based in Cincinnati. In the past, I’ve collaborated with them on some training and they’re a great group. She has co-authored or contributed to a number of books, which you can see on Amazon.com. You can find them on Twitter as @TechSolveInc. Today’s post brings some practical tips and methods you can use…

Transparency in Healthcare: Patients *Can* Handle the Truth

Transparency in Healthcare: Patients *Can* Handle the Truth

Mark’s Note: Here is another guest post from Drew Locher. I’m hoping that he’ll contribute occasionally to the blog as a guest author. My podcast with him is coming soon… please do read his “part 1” of this post and then read this. It’s a sad story about how healthcare organizations and care providers can be arrogant or tone deaf… refusing to listen to or communicate with their customer, the patient and their family. 

Case Study: Emergency Department (ED) Throughput Improvement Through Lean

Case Study: Emergency Department (ED) Throughput Improvement Through Lean

Mark’s Note: Today’s guest post comes via my friends at the ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value, who suggested this case study from Salem Health. You might remember my post from 2012 where I shared a video of some of their senior leaders talking about going to Japan. At the bottom of this post is an 18-minute long video that was shared by the Center.

The Biggest “Bang for Your Lean Buck?” Respecting Your People

The Biggest “Bang for Your Lean Buck?” Respecting Your People

Mark’s note: Today’s post is a guest contribution from Paul Critchley. Check out his previous posts here.

As a long time Lean practitioner (and now Lean consultant), I have been asked lots of questions about Lean over the years. There’s one I have gotten more often than the others, though, especially from business owners and managers: “What’s the biggest bang for my Lean buck?”

Guest Post: Is Your Organization Practicing “Unlean Lean”?

Guest Post: Is Your Organization Practicing “Unlean Lean”?

Mark’s note: Today’s post is something that Drew Locher originally published in his email newsletter (sign up here), but he’s allowing me to post it here. I’ve met Drew through the Lean Enterprise Institute, as we’re both LEI faculty members, and we’ve crossed paths as various conferences. His newsletter resonated with me because it parallels my writing about “L.A.M.E.” or what Bob Emiliani calls “Fake Lean.

By February 11, 2016 1 Comments Read More →