Tag: Training Within Industry

#TBT: Past Posts About the Society for Health Systems

#TBT: Past Posts About the Society for Health Systems

Today is the start of the main days of the annual Society for Health Systems Conference. I think this is my 9th year attending out of the past 11 or so. Follow the action on Twitter using hashtag #SHS2017. Here are a few posts from the past conferences:

Some Great #Lean Videos from the State of Washington (@ResultsWA) on Culture, Leadership & More

Some Great #Lean Videos from the State of Washington (@ResultsWA) on Culture, Leadership & More

Here are some recorded keynote talks and video presentations from the "Results Washington" annual conference, as part of the state's Lean government efforts. See this post for talks from LEI's Jim Womack and John Shook, Toyota's Jamie Bonini, and many healthcare improvement leaders.

By February 9, 2017 0 Comments Read More →
The Time I Volunteered at a Distillery and Couldn’t Help Doing Kaizen

The Time I Volunteered at a Distillery and Couldn’t Help Doing Kaizen

One thing I enjoy is the opportunity to basically be a “value adding” worker in a process. The work is pretty repetitive (but, again, it’s a very enjoyable environment) and it lets me think like an industrial engineer or a “Lean thinker” when I’m not talking with...

#TBT: Looking Back at Taiichi Ohno’s Book: Lean, Layoffs, Henry Ford, and More

#TBT: Looking Back at Taiichi Ohno’s Book: Lean, Layoffs, Henry Ford, and More

Thanks to my Amazon Kindle app on my iPad, I get to carry much of my book collection with me.

Sometimes, while on the road, I end up eating dinner alone with my iPad. Recently, I was in a Japanese restaurant and decided to revisit parts of Taiichi Ohno’s classic book Toyota Production System: Beyond Large-Scale Production from 1988.

Are Millennials the Only Ones Who Need to Understand Why?

Are Millennials the Only Ones Who Need to Understand Why?

And the idea of knowing why... again that's an old desire. It's not just a recent discovery of Simon Sinek and the outstanding book Start with Why (my friends at Gemba Academy have a podcast interview with him coming soon). Why are we doing something? Why are we starting this company? That's an old tale... are you breaking rocks or building a cathedral?

By September 16, 2015 10 Comments Read More →
Lessons from the  Football Coaching and Leadership Styles of the Oregon Ducks and Ohio State Buckeyes

Lessons from the Football Coaching and Leadership Styles of the Oregon Ducks and Ohio State Buckeyes

Note: Today is the fifth anniversary of the Haiti earthquake. Russell Maroni’s journal from his volunteer work there, including some Lean concepts he employed, is still available. You can download a free PDF and I hope you’ll consider making a charitable contribution.

By January 12, 2015 1 Comments Read More →
#Ebola – The Glaring Gap Between Staff Education and Proper, Effective Training

#Ebola – The Glaring Gap Between Staff Education and Proper, Effective Training

I saw this headline the other day: “U.S. Soldiers Get Just Four Hours of Ebola Training

The phrase “just four hours” implies that it wasn’t enough. How do we know? Maybe four hours of training, done properly, is all that’s needed.

By October 18, 2014 14 Comments Read More →
Funny Video about Lack of Labeling… or is it Lack of Training?

Funny Video about Lack of Labeling… or is it Lack of Training?

This commercial made me chuckle as somebody who has bought and used a lot of Brother label makers.

The video is meant to comically show the ill effects of a lack of labeling in a circus A/V control room (I saw this posted on Facebook by a college friend who does professional lighting design work for rock bands and pop stars). This clearly resonated with him (and I bet he labels things).

By September 12, 2014 3 Comments Read More →
Podcast #202 – Patrick Graupp, TWI in Healthcare

Podcast #202 – Patrick Graupp, TWI in Healthcare

MP3 File (run time 34:56)

My guest today for Episode 202 is Patrick Graupp, co-author of the excellent book Getting to Standard Work in Health Care: Using TWI to Create a Foundation for Quality Care, co-authored with Martha Purrier from Virginia Mason Medical Center. If you’re brand new to the Training Within Industry (TWI) model, you might want to first listen to Episode 196, with Jim Huntzinger, on “What is TWI?

Podcast #196 – Jim Huntzinger, What is TWI?

Podcast #196 – Jim Huntzinger, What is TWI?

MP3 File (run time 33:04)

jim hMy guest for episode 196 is Jim Huntzinger, founder of Lean Frontiers. Today, we’re talking about the Training Within Industry methodology and his new website WhatIsTWI.com.

We are discussing topics including what a typical TWI “journey” looks like for an organization, how TWI is such a fundamental Lean concept/method, and some examples of how TWI is helping organizations in various industries, including healthcare. What’s the latest in the seven years since our first podcast on this topic?

For a link to this episode, refer people to  www.leanblog.org/196.

Previous podcasts and related links:

Toyota Tour Thoughts – Yes, They Have Opportunities for Kaizen

Toyota Tour Thoughts – Yes, They Have Opportunities for Kaizen

I had a chance to go back to the Toyota Motor Manufacturing Texas (TMMTX) plant in south San Antonio last week with a group of executive education students at Trinity University. I first visited the plant back in 2010 and I’ve been there three times while living here the last two years.

I love helping take students there, giving them some pre-tour education about Lean (such as, “it’s not all about robots”) and helping prep them with good questions to ask about “Lean culture” that would be transferrable to their workplace…. including continuous improvement AND respect for people.

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I love Toyota’s openness and hospitality… and I see something new each time – including how they are (of course) not a perfect company. So, it’s time to share some more notes (see previous posts).

By January 13, 2014 2 Comments Read More →
Guest Post: Lean and Six Sigma (and My Son) Require Skills-Based Learning

Guest Post: Lean and Six Sigma (and My Son) Require Skills-Based Learning

Mark’s Note: Today’s guest post is by Joe Swartz, my co-author for the book Healthcare Kaizen and the newly-released book The Executive Guide to Healthcare Kaizen. I’m hoping Joe will be a regular contributor in the future and I’ll be doing a podcast with him soon (update: listen here) about his experiences at the Franciscan St. Francis Health System. Also, check out this video about their Kaizen approach. You can also read a journal article we co-authored.

Joe SwartzI was recently reminded about the difference between knowledge-based learning and skills-based learning.

My seventeen-year-old son was preparing for his driver test and asked me to help him learn to parallel park a car.   I set up some trash cans on our side street to act as a car in front and a car behind.   Then, I used my Job Instruction Training skills as I walked him through parallel parking, teaching him the steps, the key points, and the reasons why.

Then, he demonstrated what I’d taught him and parked the car within six inches of the curb on his first try.   He’s a quick learner and is in the top five percent of his high school class.   He said, “Okay I’ve got it.”

Start 2013 with “The Spirit of Kaizen”

Start 2013 with “The Spirit of Kaizen”

The-Spirit-of-Kaizen-Maurer-Bob-9780071796170As we enter the new year, it’s a great time to reflect back on 2012 – what worked and what didn’t work… what do we plan to do differently in 2013? Those are some of the core questions found on a “strategy A3” as often used in the Lean methodology.

Individuals and organizations often try to find one major improvement – a “home run,” if you will. Someone might say, “I want to lose 50 pounds” or “we need to develop a new product that doubles revenue.” Goals like that might be scary… and for good reason, as described in the new book by Robert Maurer, PhD: “The Spirit of Kaizen: Creating Lasting Excellence One Small Step at a Time.”

There’s one action that can lead to lots of little improvements (and, eventually, to innovation) – the adoption of the “kaizen” mindset.

By December 31, 2012 7 Comments Read More →

Lean Healthcare Transformation Summit 2012, Day 2

Following up on my notes from Day 1, here are some notes and key points from Day 2 of the Lean Healthcare Transformation Summit. It was great to meet and get reacquainted with so many blog and book readers. It’s such a collaborative and helpful community that meets at the LEI Summits. As the days progressed, I realized that the focus had shifted from the 1st Summit in 2010 (a focus on LEAN HEALTHCARE) to the broader focus on the big picture in 2012 (focus on HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION – with Lean being a big piece of the puzzle).

CEO Panel

For the third straight year, I was honored to moderate the CEO Panel discussion (grainy pic here), with four healthcare CEOs: Dr. Michel Tetrault (St. Boniface, Winnipeg), Rachelle Shultz (Winona Health, Minnesota), Paul DeChant (Sutter Gould Medical Foundation, California), and Joan Magrude (Missouri Baptist). Since I was triaging and asking questions from the audience, I’m going to post notes taken from Twitter (giving credit as appropriate).

Lean on Alaska Public Radio

After meeting him at a conference a few years back, I consider Patrick Anderson, executive director of Chugatchmiut, to be a good friend in the Lean world. He graciously endorsed Healthcare Kaizen, as he is working hard to create a culture where everybody participates in improvement. Patrick has also been a guest on my Podcast (episodes #53 and #71) and I share his “Lean in Alaska” blog posts via my Twitter feed, as he writes about Deming and Lean.

I was happy to discover that Chugatchmiut was the subject of a story on Alaska public radio: “New Management Style Allows Health Organization To Improve Care.”

Standardized, but Not Identical – College Basketballs

Standardized, but Not Identical – College Basketballs

As the main days of the men’s NCAA basketball tourney (“March Madness”) start Thursday, here’s a topic that might make for fun Lean discussion at work or something that you might possibly bore people with at a tourney watching party or your local sports bar (hello, Cliff Clavin). ;-) As a sad aside, my Northwestern Wildcats didn’t make the tourney (it would have been their first-ever appearance).

This New York Times story (“Home-Court Edge Begins With Ball“) reveals a surprising detail about the balls used in the college game — they are not identical at each Division I school. This lack of standardization can provide a real edge to the home team, as the visitors might be thrown off by this.

An Inc. “Best Small Company Workplace” & Their Lean Culture

An Inc. “Best Small Company Workplace” & Their Lean Culture

As I was cleaning out a pile of stuff in my office, I found an unread issue of Inc. magazine from June 2011. One of their “Best Small Company Workplaces” was Hopkins Printing in Columbus, Ohio: “Survival of the Smartest: Hopkins Printing has staked its future on cross-training.“)

Far too often, “best workplaces” profiles focus exclusively on the perks and incentives that are offered in a workplace. Things like free backrubs, gourmet meals, and car wash services are somewhat superficial or they are a form of extrinsic motivation.

I love it when organizations, small or large, in any industry, utilize Lean to tap into the intrinsic motivation that’s so powerful in creating an engaging, successful company.

Hopkins is a company with 100 employees and revenue of about $17 million. They are proof that you don’t need to be a huge company to utilize Lean, nor do you need to be a high-volume repetitive manufacturer. As a commercial printing shop, they face a number of competitive challenges that Lean has helped address.

The owner an

By January 10, 2012 3 Comments Read More →
Book Review: One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way

Book Review: One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way

While doing research for my upcoming book on “Healthcare Kaizen,” I found two books that touched on kaizen-style continuous improvement in our everyday lives. One was a brief mention in a book from a TV personality (see my post An Unexpected Lean Thinker and her “Kaizen Lifestyle”) and the second is a book with a more intensive and clinical look at kaizen, One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way by Robert Maurer PhD, a professor of behavioral sciences at UCLA.

I finally read all of Maurer’s book, in one sitting while traveling late last year, and I really enjoyed it. I’d like to share a formal review here.