New Sponsor: McKinsey’s "Tune Your Career" Event

I’d like to welcome a new sponsor to the Lean Blog: McKinsey & Company and their upcoming “Tune Your Career” event they are holding for selected invitees June 5 to 7 outside of Atlanta.

The folks at McKinsey reached out to me about helping to promote the event here on the blog, as an attempt to reach some experienced professionals who might not have considered them in their career planning.

The event, as they described it, is meant to be an informal networking event more so than a hard sell for working at McKinsey. Yes, they are collecting resumes, but it sounds like they are looking at this as more of a long-term networking event for possible relationships down the road.

Here is a job posting from last year (that had been posted as a favor) that describes some of their Lean roles. But, they are also looking for professionals in other areas, including product development and supply chain specialties.

If you have more questions, please contact the McKinsey representatives via their website and their sign up page. You do have to submit an application for the event, but if you are selected, the entire trip and experience is paid for by McKinsey.

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Mark Graban's passion is creating a better, safer, more cost effective healthcare system for patients and better workplaces for all. Mark is a consultant, author, and speaker in the "Lean healthcare" methodology. He is author of the Shingo Award-winning books Lean Hospitals and Healthcare Kaizen, as well as The Executive Guide to Healthcare Kaizen. His most recent project is an eBook titled Practicing Lean that benefits the Louise H. Batz Patient Safety Foundation, where Mark is a board member. Mark is also the VP of Improvement & Innovation Services for the technology company KaiNexus.

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6 Comments on "New Sponsor: McKinsey’s "Tune Your Career" Event"

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  1. Ron Pereira says:

    Their ad makes me laugh… since if you ask a bunch of lean people what they want to be – the pit crew or driver most would probably say pit crew. Why? Because you get to practice SMED all day long!

  2. Dan says:

    I think that’s pretty cool. I’m not experienced enough to apply, but I would if I could :P

    Must get more projects under my belt…

  3. Pete Abilla says:

    Ron’s point is spot-on:

    On the Pit-Crew, you get to practice team building, 5S, Standard Work, and cut-out wasted motion and eliminate non-value added steps. Literally, shaving seconds and tackling the problem of race car downtime would be really cool.

    Wait — the ad isn’t really about race cars; dang, I was going to apply and fulfill a childhood dream. Too bad.

    Seriously, though, Mckinsey has some really good folks and their Operations Practice is good. They are more than the typical whiteboard consultants, which is refreshing.

  4. A says:

    Funny that they were looking for client “effacing” consultants. I knew McKinsey was a client first, firm next and family last company. But I didn’t think consultants need to provide child delivery services also (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cervical_effacement)

  5. rearden215 says:

    A thunderous welcome punctuated by tinkle of lanyard ID badges a’flyin’ to the good folks who gave us Kenichi Ohmae, Tom Peters and Jeffrey Skilling.

    Ooops. Strike number three from the list of superlatives.

  6. Anonymous says:

    I worked a 4 month engagement with the company a couple of years ago. Of the 10 or so consultants I came in contact with the average tenure with the company was less than 2 years. They did some things on the engagement very well but originality wasn’t one of them as they tried to shoehorn our unique needs into their standard size shoes. I pretty much wanted their snot-nosed ivy league mba site manager to get run over on the expressway every day. If you like that kind of environment good luck.

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