Tag: WSJ

Visual Management for an International Flight, a Hospital, or a Dentist

Visual Management for an International Flight, a Hospital, or a Dentist

My wife and I are getting ready to leave tomorrow night for a two week vacation, so it jogged my memory about this story I saw back in December in the WSJ: Airlines Try to Make Coach Classier.  Anything that makes long flights more bearable is good news to me. One detail that caught my attention […]

U.S. Hospitals Have the Best E.R. Care for Kids, But Aren’t Prepared For Them?

U.S. Hospitals Have the Best E.R. Care for Kids, But Aren’t Prepared For Them?

There’s been a back and forth of views about the state of pediatric emergency medicine recently in the Wall St Journal. Let me start first, actually, with the more recent statement, a rebuttal from Michael Gerardi M.D., FACEP, President of the American College of Emergency Physicians, in the form of a letter to the editor. He wrote: “Emergency […]

Stuff I’m Reading March 2015: Womack, Sweatshops, Hospitals, and Surveys

Stuff I’m Reading March 2015: Womack, Sweatshops, Hospitals, and Surveys

As often happens, I have too many open browser tabs full of articles that I was going to potentially blog about. Too much WIP (a problem that Jim Benson will discuss in our upcoming Boston workshop). So, it’s time for me to clear out my backlog and to share some articles I’ve been reading with […]

The Patriots, Coach Belichick, Aspects of Lean Thinking, and Dr. Deming

The Patriots, Coach Belichick, Aspects of Lean Thinking, and Dr. Deming

Earlier this month, for the College Football Playoff championship game, I wrote about “Lessons from the Football Coaching and Leadership Styles of the Oregon Ducks and Ohio State Buckeyes.” I had found articles about both teams in the name of balance (and because both teams represented Lean-like thinking or new ways of doing things). I […]

By February 1, 2015 2 Comments Read More →
Lessons from the  Football Coaching and Leadership Styles of the Oregon Ducks and Ohio State Buckeyes

Lessons from the Football Coaching and Leadership Styles of the Oregon Ducks and Ohio State Buckeyes

Note: Today is the fifth anniversary of the Haiti earthquake. Russell Maroni’s journal from his volunteer work there, including some Lean concepts he employed, is still available. You can download a free PDF and I hope you’ll consider making a charitable contribution. Now on to today’s somewhat trivial, by comparison, topic. Tonight is the inaugural […]

By January 12, 2015 1 Comments Read More →
What Are Your New Year’s Lean Resolutions for 2015? What Problems Are You Solving?

What Are Your New Year’s Lean Resolutions for 2015? What Problems Are You Solving?

Happy New Year! Let’s talk about Lean. Let’s talk about Kaizen and continuous improvement and how to get better in 2015. You’re possibly thinking, “Hey, Mark, chill… watch some football… relax… it’s a holiday.” But, you’re reading this, so you must be as excited about the new year as I am. The start of a […]

By December 31, 2014 1 Comments Read More →
Overcapacity and Overproduction in the Auto Industry (and Healthcare)

Overcapacity and Overproduction in the Auto Industry (and Healthcare)

I’ve seen this going around social media the past few days, an article with shocking pictures of all of the cars and trucks that have been built, only to sit in huge inventory yards around the world: “Where the World’s Unsold Cars Go To Die.” The photos are dramatic, including this one: Note: The Jalopnik […]

Lime Shortages, Cost, Price, and Lean

Lime Shortages, Cost, Price, and Lean

Limes are a very big deal here in San Antonio, between the cuisine and, of course, margaritas. Hint: life is too short to drink “margaritas” with some corn-syrupy pre-made mix. All you need is tequila, lime juice, and agave nectar. Maybe Cointreau or good triple sec. But, the price of limes has been sky high […]

Parallels Between Philadelphia Eagles’ Coach Chip Kelly & A Lean Leader

Parallels Between Philadelphia Eagles’ Coach Chip Kelly & A Lean Leader

The Philadelphia Eagles are playing in an NFL playoff matchup tonight against the New Orleans Saints. I’d admired Eagles head coach Chip Kelly and his somewhat unlikely rise through the coaching ranks. He’s well known from his successful stint at the University of Oregon, but before that he was the offensive coordinator at New Hampshire, […]

By January 4, 2014 6 Comments Read More →
“Why Charter Schools Work” – Questions of Autonomy, Responsibility, Standardized Work & Results

“Why Charter Schools Work” – Questions of Autonomy, Responsibility, Standardized Work & Results

My mom is a retired public school elementary teacher, so I’ve heard plenty of stories about bad management decisions within a school system and other craziness that runs the risk of crushing souls… but thankfully my mom (and so many other teachers) are strong people and they can put up with it because their work […]

More Than Grammar in This WSJ Grammar Quiz

More Than Grammar in This WSJ Grammar Quiz

Last week, my dad pointed out this grammar quiz on the Wall Street Journal website (as part of the article “This Embarrasses You and I*: Grammar Gaffes Invade the Office in an Age of Informal Email, Texting and Twitter.” We both scored 22 out of 22 on the quiz, as my dad and I know […]

Stuff I’m Reading, April 20 – Cancer Cars, ThedaCare Payments, Boss Apes

In a recurring feature, here are links to some more articles I’ve read recently that might be of interest: Luxury car program brings cancer patients to treatment in style (KVUE-TV, Austin) – a great non-profit effort started by a former colleague at Dell, addressing a very important part of the care value stream — getting […]

The More Sophisticated Brains – Robots or Employees?

The More Sophisticated Brains – Robots or Employees?

Last week, an article in the Wall Street Journal caught my eye: “The Robots Are Coming to Hospitals:  A New Breed of Blue-Collar Robots is Handling the Dirty Work, Transporting Linens and Laundry.” My immediate short response was to tweet out an illustration that I hoped would get circulated around Twitter. I also got an […]

WSJ: How to Be a Better Boss? Spend Time on the Front Lines

Last Thursday’s Journal had a story titled “How to Be a Better Boss? Spend Time on the Front Lines.” The article talks about senior leaders going to see work being done at the front lines. Does this have to be a special act, like some sort of “Undercover Boss” reality show stunt or can it […]

By February 15, 2012 11 Comments Read More →
Kaizen on the Boeing 737 Line

Kaizen on the Boeing 737 Line

There was a nice article in the Wall Street Journal this week about the Boeing 737 and some of their Lean and Kaizen (continuous improvement) work: “Boeing Teams Speed Up 737 Output — Jet Maker’s Innovation Crews Search for Ways to Streamline Production as Aircraft Demand Soars.” Boeing needs to increase production by more than […]

By February 10, 2012 2 Comments Read More →
Yes, We Need Staff Ideas – But, How to Manage Those Ideas?

Yes, We Need Staff Ideas – But, How to Manage Those Ideas?

It’s always great to see stories in the major media outlets about engaging front-line staff in improvement ideas. Recently, we had a piece in USA Today that I blogged about  and now we have one in the Wall St. Journal titled: “For Bright Ideas, Ask the Staff.” The article starts on a very promising note, […]

By October 20, 2011 5 Comments Read More →
Fox News Channel Understands “Lean” Better than the WSJ

Fox News Channel Understands “Lean” Better than the WSJ

On Friday, there was yet another Wall Street Journal article about Lean (fixating as they always do on the “Just In Time” component). The article titled “For Lean Factories, No Buffer” yet again takes an outdated 1980s view that Lean is about low inventory. On the flip side, I was more pleasantly surprised that Fox […]

Questions about and Lessons from a Steering Wheel Falling Off

Questions about and Lessons from a Steering Wheel Falling Off

In the news yesterday, a General Motors recall over what could be just one isolated steering wheel problem in an Ohio-built Chevrolet (don’t call it Chevy) Cruze. Most news stories about the recall just mention that one steering wheel came off while an owner was driving down the road (yikes!) The Wall Street Journal story […]