Tag: GM

Throwback Thursday: 23 Tweets I Might Have Sent in 2002

Throwback Thursday: 23 Tweets I Might Have Sent in 2002

I have been going through some old papers recently and I found two sheets of paper with hand-written thoughts or “truisms” that I had scribbled down in early 2002. The word truism, it turns out, doesn’t mean “true” so much as it means “a statement that is obviously true and says nothing new or interesting.” Oops. […]

Cartoon: The Workplace “Brain Check Station”

Cartoon: The Workplace “Brain Check Station”

Here’s my latest cartoon collaboration with a skilled artist (and medical assistant), Carrie Howarth. You can see the whole series via this link. How many organizations ask their employees to check their brain at the door? This certainly happened during my time at General Motors 20 years ago (and it had been happening for decades there). […]

By February 10, 2015 0 Comments Read More →
Throwback Thursday: GM Got Gamed & The Original Intent of Their Standup Meeting

Throwback Thursday: GM Got Gamed & The Original Intent of Their Standup Meeting

Continuing the “Throwback Thursday” theme for the 10th anniversary of my blog, today’s post looks back at and builds upon one of my favorites from 2007. The post is a “GM War Story” from 1995 when I was just starting my career: “GM Got Gamed (Or, How to Fudge Your Production Numbers)” There was a […]

By January 15, 2015 1 Comments Read More →
Fear of speaking up is a broader problem, not just in military medicine

Fear of speaking up is a broader problem, not just in military medicine

Announcement: Dr. Greg Jacobson and I are doing a new webinar for KaiNexus on “More Leadership Behaviors That Create a Culture of Continuous Improvement‘” on January 27. It’s free… learn more and register here. * * * * * * * * * Here’s a troubling article from the New York Times: “Military Hospital Care […]

By January 13, 2015 3 Comments Read More →
What’s Up With Neckties in Healthcare?

What’s Up With Neckties in Healthcare?

It’s a simple question: what’s up with so many men wearing ties in healthcare? Are you / they wearing them because you like to, want to, or have to? When I worked at a video game and computer software store in high school, I had to wear a shirt and tie. This was the era […]

By December 17, 2014 13 Comments Read More →
GM CEO Mary Barra Celebrates Employee Kaizen

GM CEO Mary Barra Celebrates Employee Kaizen

Time magazine recently featured GM’s relatively new CEO, Mary Barra, on the cover and in this story: “Mary Barra’s Bumpy Ride at the Wheel of GM“ I can’t find a free version of the story online. Here is a USA Today summary that says “Five things ‘Time’ revealed about GM CEO Mary Barra.” I’ve been critical […]

By October 13, 2014 1 Comments Read More →
This Date in Lean Blog History: August 6

This Date in Lean Blog History: August 6

My blog will turn 10 years old in February, 2015. You’re probably either thinking, “Wow, that’s awesome!” or “Get a life, dude.” :-) Here’s a look back at some of the posts from August 6 in past years… what was I writing about? 2013: Podcast #183 – Scott Sambucci, Lean Startup Ideas for Sales 2012: Dr. Donald […]

Overcapacity and Overproduction in the Auto Industry (and Healthcare)

Overcapacity and Overproduction in the Auto Industry (and Healthcare)

I’ve seen this going around social media the past few days, an article with shocking pictures of all of the cars and trucks that have been built, only to sit in huge inventory yards around the world: “Where the World’s Unsold Cars Go To Die.” The photos are dramatic, including this one: Note: The Jalopnik […]

My Skepticism about GM’s “Speak Up for Safety” Program

My Skepticism about GM’s “Speak Up for Safety” Program

I have a new article posted on LinkedIn: “My New Program: Speak Up About “Speak Up for Safety” at GM.” GM seems to continue their “blame the employees” game, as they’ve suspended two engineers (in my mind, blaming individuals for systemic cultural problems). CEO Mary Barra says that some executives may be punished, but starting […]

The Day I Thought I’d Get Fired from “The Old GM” – Putting Quality over Quantity

The Day I Thought I’d Get Fired from “The Old GM” – Putting Quality over Quantity

Following up on yesterday’s post that talked about “the old GM” putting cost ahead of quality, I sometimes I get flashbacks to my days working for General Motors. I’ve been in healthcare for 8.5 years now, but at the start of my career, I was an entry-level industrial engineer at the GM Powertrain Livonia Engine plant […]

Are Today’s Hospitals Too Much Like “The Old GM?”

Are Today’s Hospitals Too Much Like “The Old GM?”

As a former GM employee and a GM customer, I’m really fascinated by the reaction of the public, the media, and Congress to the recalls and scandal over ignition switch problems in some GM small cars from recent years. The defect or design flaw is believed to have caused between 13 and 300 deaths (depending […]

Did GM Forget that the Customer Should Come First? And Who Forgot Exactly?

Did GM Forget that the Customer Should Come First? And Who Forgot Exactly?

I wrote an article for LinkedIn yesterday about the recent GM ignition problem controversy and recall. I commented mainly on the video put out by new CEO Mary Barra (which I encourage you to watch). As a former GM employee, I reacted (at a gut level) to a few things in the video. The main […]

Videos Look Inside the Tesla (former NUMMI) Factory – Will They Be More like Toyota or GM?

Videos Look Inside the Tesla (former NUMMI) Factory – Will They Be More like Toyota or GM?

I was able to tour the NUMMI factory in 2005, which I really enjoyed (see my series of blog posts here). NUMMI was, of course, a joint venture between Toyota and GM (as John Shook talked about recently at the Lean Startup conference). NUMMI was shuttered a few years back when GM pulled out of […]

By December 31, 2013 4 Comments Read More →
What I’m Reading 12/30/13: GM’s CEO, Human Error, Costing, and Really Deep Sleepers

What I’m Reading 12/30/13: GM’s CEO, Human Error, Costing, and Really Deep Sleepers

To close out the year 2013, I once again need to close some browser tabs that are full of things that I was maybe going to write about, but don’t merit a full post. So, the latest in my occasional “What I’m Reading” series: New York State Hospital Data Exposes Big Markups, and Odd Bargains […]

By December 30, 2013 0 Comments Read More →
Detroit Elects a Lean Thinking Mayor? Will it Make a Difference?

Detroit Elects a Lean Thinking Mayor? Will it Make a Difference?

I grew up just outside of Detroit, so I’m always pulling for the city to turn things around. The newly-elected mayor, Mike Duggan, is the former CEO of Detroit Medical Center. Back in 2009, I blogged about a radio commercial for DMC that featured Duggan talking about healthcare quality improvement. A hat tip goes to […]

By November 14, 2013 9 Comments Read More →
The Term “Lean Production” is 25 Years Old – Some Thoughts on the Original John Krafcik Article

The Term “Lean Production” is 25 Years Old – Some Thoughts on the Original John Krafcik Article

People often ask me where the term “Lean” comes from. It’s not an acronym, so it shouldn’t be spelled “LEAN” (but it often is). Lean is not a synonym for “lacking or deficient” in resources, as some dictionaries will tell you or as it gets used in news headlines about “surviving the lean economy.” The […]

By September 23, 2013 10 Comments Read More →
Eiji Toyoda, Credited with Developing TPS and Expanding Toyota into North America, Passes Away at 100

Eiji Toyoda, Credited with Developing TPS and Expanding Toyota into North America, Passes Away at 100

Eiji Toyoda, a key figure in the growth and expansion of Toyota and the Toyota Production System practices has passed away this week, just past his 100th birthday. His death has received fairly prominent coverage in the business press, including: NY Times: Eiji Toyoda, Promoter of the Toyota Way and Engineer of Its Growth, Dies […]

By September 20, 2013 3 Comments Read More →
#Lean Healthcare: The Really Good, the Sort of Bad, and the Ugly

#Lean Healthcare: The Really Good, the Sort of Bad, and the Ugly

I had a speaking engagement yesterday for a large system, with the audience consisting mainly of hospital CEOs and CFOs. I was able to be around for the entire morning, which included a really outstanding kickoff talk by the system CEO (talking about process improvement as a key strategy) and followed by two internal P.I. […]