Tag: Flinchbaugh

Podcast #261 – Jamie Flinchbaugh, Talking About Lean

Podcast #261 – Jamie Flinchbaugh, Talking About Lean

Joining me for Episode #261 is an old friend and trusted mentor, Jamie Flinchbaugh. Among other things, he’s the co-author of the book The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean. He writes for a number of publications, has his own blog, and was previously a guest blogger here on LeanBlog.org. He’s a speaker, investor (including in KaiNexus), and a great guy.

By August 30, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
It might be too late to get “Buy In” by the time you bemoan the lack of it

It might be too late to get “Buy In” by the time you bemoan the lack of it

Another question I get thrown at me very often is something along the lines of “How do we get more buy in for ______” with that space being filled with Lean, Kaizen, 5S, using the EMR system, improvement, or any number of terms. If you do a Google search for Lean “lack of buy in”...

By February 9, 2016 4 Comments Read More →
Guest Post: Use forced habits to change behaviors

Guest Post: Use forced habits to change behaviors

Mark’s note: Today’s post is by an old friend of mine and this blog, Jamie Flinchbaugh. This post is a preview of the free webinar that Jamie will be doing next Tuesday, hosted by me and KaiNexus. We hope you can join us.

Weekend Listening: Two Podcasts with Mark Graban

Weekend Listening: Two Podcasts with Mark Graban

Normally, I like interviewing other people, through my podcast series (and this recent blog post with a hospital leader telling her story of putting patient safety first).

Sometimes, the tables get turned and I’m the one being interviewed.

By February 28, 2015 0 Comments Read More →
Cleaning out the Backlog: Krafcik, Email, Lincoln, Leadership, Humility, Patient Falls

Cleaning out the Backlog: Krafcik, Email, Lincoln, Leadership, Humility, Patient Falls

As I sometimes do, I’m going to close out a bunch of browser tabs and share some articles that caught my eye recently but don’t merit full blog posts of their own. I’m cleaning out the LeanBlog backlog and trying to reduce inventory… so here we go:

Toyota’s Jamie Bonini on Organizational Culture

Toyota’s Jamie Bonini on Organizational Culture

ToyotaLast week at the Lean Healthcare Transformation Summit, I really enjoyed the presentation by Jamie Bonini,  General Manager of the  Toyota Production System Support Center (TSSC). Jamie started his career at Chrysler (where he knew Jamie Flinchbaugh, a good friend of this blog) and both Jamies, like me, are graduates of the MIT Leaders for Global Operations program.

Jamie shared great insights on what we might call “Lean culture” as Toyota aims for and others have emulated.

Update on KaiNexus – Making Improvement Easier in New Ways & Places

Update on KaiNexus – Making Improvement Easier in New Ways & Places

KaiNexus taller version of logoIt’s been about a year since I started working with a software startup KaiNexus. We’ve made a lot of progress in that year, refining our product, signing on more early adopter customers, and adding more talent as we continue pretty much bootstrapping our growth. We recently released our first iOS app for our customers and we announced that Jamie Flinchbaugh has invested in KaiNexus, joining our advisory team. You can read more news here.

We have also compiled some aggregate statistics about our users – healthcare organizations that are using Lean and Kaizen methods to improve patient care and their organizations’ performance:

Continuing Experiments in Self Publishing & Lean Publishing

Continuing Experiments in Self Publishing & Lean Publishing

After my first experiment with the great Leanpub.com service (my “Best of Lean Blog 2011” eBook), I was happy to see my good friend Jamie Flinchbaugh experiment with publishing some original content on that site.

Jamie’s new book is  A3 Problem Solving: Applying Lean Thinking, available now. It’s been a busy week for me, so I haven’t read it yet, but I’ve heard good comments from othrs and I trust Jamie’s thinking and writing to be outstanding. The book has a suggested price of $7.50, or you can pay just the minimum price of $3. Actually, you can pay ANY price you like, as long as it’s above $3.  Some of his buyers have chosen to pay MORE than $7.50, which is an interesting experiment, to say the least.

By February 17, 2012 4 Comments Read More →
Free iPhone & Android App – “Lean Daily”

Free iPhone & Android App – “Lean Daily”

This is free app that’s brought to you by a coalition of lean bloggers. Learn more about it or download it directly from the iTunes Store or the Android Marketplace.

A number of us combined efforts to provide this as a free service to our loyal readers, so thanks go to:

By November 15, 2011 8 Comments Read More →
“Management By Walking Around” vs. “Gemba Walks”

“Management By Walking Around” vs. “Gemba Walks”

It’s important not to confuse a proper Lean “gemba walk” with the idea of “management by walking around” (MBWA).  What did the late, great Dr. W. Edwards Deming say in 1982?

‘Management by walking around’ is hardly ever effective. The reason is that someone in management, walking around, has little idea about what questions to ask, and usually does not pause long enough at any spot to get the right answer.”

-W. Edwards Deming, “Out of the Crisis

From The Lean Edge: Alternatives to Hospitals Spending, Building, and Hiring More

From The Lean Edge: Alternatives to Hospitals Spending, Building, and Hiring More

My bedToday, I’m linking to a response I gave on TheLeanEdge.org‘s blog that features some really well known Lean authors (people I really have learned a lot from, so it’s an honor to be included).

The question they posed (which is hard if not impossible to figure out, due to the design of the site) is this:

“What is the lean approach to capital expenditure? As Toyota announces a new plant in high-cost Japan, it also claims that the overall investment is 40% lower than an existing equivalent size plant. How is this possible? What is the impact of lean on the investment cycle?”

My response, in terms of healthcare, begins with:

Guest Post: What It Means

Mark’s Note: Here’s part 4 of a series by our guest blogger, Andy Wagner. Start reading with Part 1 here.

“What lies behind us and what lies in front of us pales in comparison to what lies within us.”
— Ralph Waldo Emerson

Jamie Flinchbaugh recently hosted an interesting discussion on who is responsible for lean successes, and perhaps more tellingly, lean failures.   The last several days, I’ve shared my personal lean journey of the past six months.   I hope to continue to do so as I make progress, both personally and professionally.   For some eight years, I’ve read books, articles, blogs, and training packages on   this thing called “lean”.   Like most of us, I’ve seen and applied lean tools.   I’ve cheered the successes and jeered the the LAME imitations.

Guest Post: What Do You Do When…

Mark’s note: I’ve known Bruce Baker for a few years as a thoughtful commenter here on the Lean Blog. I was thrilled when he started his own blog, Lean Is Good, as it’s quickly become one of my favorites in the lean blogsosphere. Now, the first guest post from Bruce:

Last month I wrote a post on my blog about 5S shadow boards and reflection.   The post focused what should be done when a tool is ‘found out of place,’ the fallacy of the centralized shadow board, and wrapped up with a confessional from me about how I failed to help people get the most out of their 5S efforts in the past.

I’ve thought about this post and a few of the comments that it provoked and I’ll share a few thoughts with and invite your comments below.

By January 28, 2010 8 Comments Read More →

Leading Lean A-Z: K, Be Kinetic

This continues a series titled Leading Lean A-Z. This post is K: Be Kinetic.

Did you ever have one of those days where you just wanted to put your feet up on your desk and breath in and out for a while? The lean journey will still be there. There are still many challenges out there. I don’t need to do it all today. Let’s just take our foot off the gas.

But change requires momentum. That momentum is either gained or lost. And to feed that momentum, the leader must be a continuous provider of kinetic energy.

No Rx for Lean

No Rx for Lean

I recently have had the opportunity to review a wide range of sites and companies and provide feedback on their lean journey. One of the things that really surprised me was how many of them were still trying to follow a prescription for lean. I heard things such as “the book says to do this but it doesn’t work for us, what should we do?”

Leading Lean A-Z: F for be First

by Jamie Flinchbaugh, co-author, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean

[This is a continuation of a thread on Leading Lean topics from A-Z]

When visiting companies that feel better about their lean journey than they probably should, perhaps the most common thing I hear is “yes, we have management support. They are 100 percent behind us.” But behind is still behind. Leadership is about being out in front. An essential element of leadership is being first, exemplifying the change you want to see in your organization.

When is it time for lean "lite"?

by Jamie Flinchbaugh, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean

Many of the frequent LeanBlog readers will know that I have been a regular guest blogger on LeanBlog.org. I am not in any way ending that relationship as I have enjoyed my collaboration with Mark Graban which is many years old now.

Learn to Play Before Picking Up a Sax

by Jamie Flinchbaugh, co-author, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Lean

A3 thinking, A3 problem solving, A3 report writing – whatever you might call it is growing popular in the same way that value stream mapping did many years ago. But just like value stream mapping, just using the tool solves nothing. You still need to get the right thinking in place to make any of the tools, methods or skills effective.