LeanBlog Video Podcast #2 – Kevin Frieswick, Error Proofing Handwashing

I’m still experimenting with video podcasting, after my first attempt with Jamie Finchbaugh. LeanBlog Video Podcast #2 is content you may have seen and heard before — the video from Kevin Frieswick and MetroWest Medical Center with the device for error proofing hand washing on the way into patient rooms, combined with some excerpts of audio from LeanBlog Podcast #65.

It’s a video world, so hopefully this gets Lean content to a new audience. I’m trying to keep these under 10 minutes so I can also post them on YouTube. I have also set up a separate video feed through iTunes (search for “LeanBlog”). For the whole series of Video Podcasts, visit or go back to www.LeanVideoPodcast.org.

Any video podcasts will also have the audio versions available if you’re subscribed to existing feeds. While some said the first video podcast didn’t add much since it’s just talking heads, I think seeing someone talks adds a bit of their personality that doesn’t come across in audio.

I have four video podcasts coming up with Norman Bodek and two that I recorded just yesterday with Matthew May about his upcoming book In Pursuit of Elegance: Why the Best Ideas Have Something Missing.

Here is a YouTube version of the video:

As always, feedback and constructive criticism are welcome.

For audio podcast episodes, please visit  www.leanpodcast.org. For video podcasts, visit  www.leanvideopodcast.org or visit my  YouTube Channel. You can also subscribe to either podcast series through Apple iTunes –  Audio or Video.


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Mark Graban's passion is creating a better, safer, more cost effective healthcare system for patients and better workplaces for all. Mark is a consultant, author, and speaker in the "Lean healthcare" methodology. He is author of the Shingo Award-winning books Lean Hospitals and Healthcare Kaizen, as well as The Executive Guide to Healthcare Kaizen. His most recent project is an eBook titled Practicing Lean that benefits the Louise H. Batz Patient Safety Foundation, where Mark is a board member. Mark is also the VP of Improvement & Innovation Services for the technology company KaiNexus.

9 Comments on "LeanBlog Video Podcast #2 – Kevin Frieswick, Error Proofing Handwashing"

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  1. Mike G. says:

    I heard a story on NPR yesterday about elementary school teachers teaching children to properly and effectively wash their hands. Part of the method includes having them sing the alphabet song all the way through to ensure the proper washing time. Adult versions were experimented with and the most popular was the “bridge chorus” from Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody.

    BTW–raise your webcam level a little to eliminate the Big Brother Effect in your intros. Good vid-cast.

  2. Mark Graban says:

    Mike – when you say “Big Brother” effect, is that the TV show or Orwell you’re referring to?

    I’ll get better with lighting and webcam angles… glad you like the content at least.

  3. Richard Chapman says:

    I can see that boom being broken off by the first patient or maintenance trolley that passes it. Good idea, but will need something more robust.

    How about infrared beam or something that will go beep at you if you don’t dispense the gel, but is not going to get itself broken if failure occurs. Because a broken poka-yoke is two process failures, the actual process failure and the poka-yoke. Multiplying your problems.

  4. Tom Leifer says:

    Mark (and, of course, Kevin) – great podcast, great example of taking “systems improvement” in healthcare from theory into practice, and one of the only physically real systems improvement ideas I’ve seen for one of the most frustrating and dangerous problems in hospitals. A thought: have you considered using a “light-based” barrier instead of a physical barrier (the wand)? The wand seems to introduce multiple, physical failure points – plus, it might make suggest to some a theme of ‘incarceration’ in a WWII-kind of way. Maybe a prominent red-light/green-light kind of thing; another addition could be a recorder that captures video whenever someone passes through the red-light zone… just some thoughts. Really great work as it is, though! Please carry on!

  5. Chad Walters Chad Walters
    Twitter:
    says:

    Mark –

    http://www.carometecusa.com/hygiene-equipment/hand-disinfection/type-23741-soap-dispenser-turnstile/

    This is similar to the equipment setup used by The Dannon Company in Minster, Ohio for poka-yoking handwashing. People enter the plant through a soap dispenser turnstile. Immediately after the turnstile is a motion-activated sink and bank of Dyson hand dryers.

    Their setup overall can be defeated because the double doors leading to the corral with the turnstile are both an entrance and exit, and someone can open the enter door then pull open the exit door and bypass the corral all together. It is a rigid system that takes about 45 seconds to enter-soap-lather-rinse-dry before heading to the floor so it can be annoying to use it multiple times a day.
    Chad Walters recently posted..What Your #Mother Can Teach You About #LeanMy Profile

    • Mark Graban
      Twitter:
      says:

      Thanks for sharing the parallel, Chad.

      I think we’d agree that good error proofing has to be designed so that it can’t be easily circumvented.

      Hospital staff complain about the amount of time it takes to wash/gel their hands so many times each day. Responsible management and good system design would have that time built into their day. Nurses, doctors, etc. shouldn’t feel pressured to cut corners on hand hygiene because there isn’t enough time in the day.
      Mark Graban recently posted..Dr. Deming’s “Role of a Manager of People”My Profile

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